Last edited by Printed for R. Baldwin
10.07.2021 | History

2 edition of An Impartial account of the nature and tendency of the late addresses, in a letter to a gentleman in the countrey found in the catalog.

An Impartial account of the nature and tendency of the late addresses, in a letter to a gentleman in the countrey

the life of Sir Edward Carson, Lord Carson of Duncairn

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      • Caption titleImprint from colophonReproduction of original in the University of Illinois LibraryWing I73AMicrofilm. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University Microfilms International, 1984. 1 microfilm reel ; 35 mm. (Early English books, 1641-1700 ; 1528:19)s 1984 miu n

        StatementPrinted for R. Baldwin
        PublishersPrinted for R. Baldwin
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1681
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 123 p. :
        Number of Pages92
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1
        2Early English books, 1641-1700 -- 1528:19
        3

        nodata File Size: 6MB.


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IDC Publishers (Organization)

The plans, principles, and arguments, contained in that work, are placed before the eyes of the nation, and of the world, in a fair, open, and manly manner, and nothing more is necessary than to refute them. London : Printed for R. I defy your Lordships to prove, that a tittle of it has been used yet; and if we but go on, my Lords, with the frugality we have hitherto done, we shall leave to our heirs and successors, when we go out of the world, the whole stock of wisdom, untouched, that we brought in; and there is no doubt but they will follow our example.

Baldwyn MLA Citation Shaftesbury, Anthony Ashley Cooper. And then they are not ashamed to say, We are obliged to declare many of these Doctrines unsound and dangerous, contrary to the sacred Scriptures and our most excellent Confession.

An impartial account of the nature and tendency of the late addresses : in a letter to a gentleman in the country : Shaftesbury, Anthony Ashley Cooper, Earl of, 1621

Grey, or any other man, sit down and endeavour to put his thoughts together, for the purpose of drawing up an application to Parliament for a reform of Parliament, and he will soon convince himself of the folly of the attempt. 'That we shall all be unanimous in expressing our attachment to the constitution, I am confident.

'Besides these blessings, my Lords, that cover us from the sole of the foot to the crown of the head, do we not see a race of youths growing up to be Kings, who are the very paragons of virtue? By taking this public and national ground, all objections against partial Addresses on the one side, or private associations on the other, will be done away; THE NATION WILL DECLARE ITS OWN REFORMS; and the clamour about Party and Faction, or Ins or Outs, will become ridiculous.

The enquiry, therefore, which is of necessity the first step in the business, cannot be trusted to Parliament, but must be undertaken by a distinct body of men, separated from every suspicion of corruption or influence.

It is a subject upon which there can be no divided opinion in this house. Surely they who preach up Christ in this manner, do Dishonour both to the Father and the Son. 'But, my Lords, as all this wisdom is hereditary property, for the sole benefit of us and our heirs, and it is necessary that the people should know where to get a supply for their own use, the excellence of our constitution has provided a King for this very purpose, and for no other.

Yet these are the sources from which Addresses have sprung.